2016 AV Challenge: Tip #2

You may have heard that your words have the power to grow your child’s brain and that children who are successful in kindergarten have heard far more words in their first years than their less successful peers. All of this is true, but it’s not just the number of words that matters… the richness and quality of those words is important, too!

Continue reading

“She’s Doing So Well, But…”

If a child with hearing loss is scoring at or above the level expected for her hearing peers, it’s time to celebrate (and graduate)!  But why does this seemingly joyful milestone cause so much anxiety for parents and professionals?  Why do children who are “doing well” still struggle sometimes, and what can be done about it?

Continue reading

Music, Art, Theatre, and Dance Lessons for Children with Hearing Loss

There are many benefits of music, theater, art, and dance education for all.  Arts education is linked to improved focus and behavior, academic achievement, higher SAT scores, and a host of other benefits.  The positive cognitive, creative, physical, social effects are undeniable.  But what about arts education for children with hearing loss? 

Continue reading

Co-Managing Behavior with Parents

Behavior is a tricky, touchy subject.  Every family parents differently and has different experiences, expectations, and emotions regarding how best to help children learn to behave within the norms of their family and culture.  Usually, parents are the primary disciplinarians, the ones setting the standards for their children and dealing with the tantrums, disagreements, and power struggles that are a normal part of growing up.  But when a child’s behavior needs spill over into a therapy session, how can professionals and parents partner for success?

Continue reading

ADVANCING PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES IN POVERTY

Susan Lenihan Ph.D., CED

Jenna Voss Ph.D., LSLS Cert. AVEd

Colleen Kinsella

Approximately 1 in 5 children in the US live in poverty.  How can listening and spoken language professionals better serve them?   Continue reading

PARENTAL PERSPECTIVES: FUELING SUCCESS IN THE MAINSTREAM CLASSROOM

Melanie Ribich

Kat Golden

Wendy Horvath

Tammy Kenny

Cynthia Logsdon

A panel of parents of children with hearing loss who listen and talk shared their experiences, tips, and wisdom.  They had so many great quotes and insights, I’m just going to list them below.  Their comments say far more than I ever could!   Continue reading

QUALITY OR QUANTITY OF LANGUAGE: WHERE TO FOCUS?

Ronda Rufsvold ABD, LSLS Cert. AVEd

Ye Wang Ph.D.

Ronda Rufsvold, a PhD student in the Deaf Education program at Teachers College, Columbia University, under the direction of Dr. Wang, presented her research on quantity vs. quality of child directed language.   Continue reading

Complex and Challenging Cases: WEBINAR RECORDING

See below for a recording of my May 2016 presentation for Cochlear and the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children/Renwick Centre “Complex and Challenging Cases” [CC]

 

Aim for the Middle

It is so exciting to read about people with hearing loss in the news accomplishing great things.  Academic award winners, artists, actors, athletes — their stories raise public awareness about hearing loss and dispel stereotypes about people who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Conversely, there are those people with hearing loss who struggle mightily — never achieving age-appropriate language abilities, falling behind in school, or failing to find employment.  With such a broad spectrum of outcomes for people with hearing loss, how do we make sense of it all?

Continue reading

Falling into a Hole

When I help children learn language, I want them to fall into a really deep hole.  It’s not as mean as it sounds!  By thinking about learning new skills as “falling into a hole” vs. “climbing into a mountain,” we, parents and professionals, can structure our play with children to help them learn more while struggling less.  Here’s how it works.

Continue reading