Use Your Voice, Make a Choice

Young children love to be in control (who doesn’t?).  Think about it: so many aspects of their lives are decided for them — what and when they’ll eat, where they go each day, when they take a bath, etc.  For children with hearing loss, parents may tend to be even more directive, giving short, simple commands to head off any misunderstandings by a child with limited language.  But challenge yourself!  Giving choices can help meet an important developmental need while growing language skills as well!

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A Figure of Speech

Figurative language: idioms, metaphors, similes, and the like, can be one of the most difficult aspects of language for English language learners, and children with hearing loss, to master.  How can we help children learn, understand, and use nonliteral language in a way that is natural?

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HELP! My Child Won’t Wear His Cochlear Implant Processor!

This is a common question (more like agonized wail) I hear from parents, both in person and online.  You go through the entire process of CI candidacy and surgery, and then… the child doesn’t want to (or just plain won’t) wear the cochlear implant processor.  Where do we go from here!?!

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Living Room Idol

Whether you love singing or wouldn’t be caught dead singing in the shower, singing is a terrific way to help your child with hearing loss learn important listening and spoken language skills.  You don’t have to be an award-winning singer to build your child’s brain through music. 

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2016 AV Challenge: Tip #4

I often receive questions from parents, especially around the holidays, for suggestions of toys that will help their children grow listening, speech, and language skills… and have fun!  This week’s tip helps you zero in on what kinds of toys promote language, and which you can walk right by in the toys store because they actually hurt your child’s language progress.  Read on!  

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2016 AV Challenge: Tip #2

You may have heard that your words have the power to grow your child’s brain and that children who are successful in kindergarten have heard far more words in their first years than their less successful peers. All of this is true, but it’s not just the number of words that matters… the richness and quality of those words is important, too!

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“She’s Doing So Well, But…”

If a child with hearing loss is scoring at or above the level expected for her hearing peers, it’s time to celebrate (and graduate)!  But why does this seemingly joyful milestone cause so much anxiety for parents and professionals?  Why do children who are “doing well” still struggle sometimes, and what can be done about it?

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Music, Art, Theatre, and Dance Lessons for Children with Hearing Loss

There are many benefits of music, theater, art, and dance education for all.  Arts education is linked to improved focus and behavior, academic achievement, higher SAT scores, and a host of other benefits.  The positive cognitive, creative, physical, social effects are undeniable.  But what about arts education for children with hearing loss? 

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Co-Managing Behavior with Parents

Behavior is a tricky, touchy subject.  Every family parents differently and has different experiences, expectations, and emotions regarding how best to help children learn to behave within the norms of their family and culture.  Usually, parents are the primary disciplinarians, the ones setting the standards for their children and dealing with the tantrums, disagreements, and power struggles that are a normal part of growing up.  But when a child’s behavior needs spill over into a therapy session, how can professionals and parents partner for success?

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ADVANCING PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES IN POVERTY

Susan Lenihan Ph.D., CED

Jenna Voss Ph.D., LSLS Cert. AVEd

Colleen Kinsella

Approximately 1 in 5 children in the US live in poverty.  How can listening and spoken language professionals better serve them?   Continue reading