Chunks vs. True Sentences

“Shut the door,” “Sit down,” “Go to sleep.”  We write them as multiple words, but do young children view them that way? How do we know if a child has learned a “chunk” versus really putting together a multi-word utterance? Continue reading

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HELP! My Child Won’t Wear His Cochlear Implant Processor!

This is a common question (more like agonized wail) I hear from parents, both in person and online.  You go through the entire process of CI candidacy and surgery, and then… the child doesn’t want to (or just plain won’t) wear the cochlear implant processor.  Where do we go from here!?!

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Learning to Listen Sounds

The cow says “moo,” the sheep says “baa,” and pretty soon the entire therapy room is sounding like a barnyard… but what are these Learning to Listen Sounds all about and why are week p-p-p-ing for the boat and woof-woof-woof-ing for the dog to help children learn to listen and talk?

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2016 AV Challenge: Tip #4

I often receive questions from parents, especially around the holidays, for suggestions of toys that will help their children grow listening, speech, and language skills… and have fun!  This week’s tip helps you zero in on what kinds of toys promote language, and which you can walk right by in the toys store because they actually hurt your child’s language progress.  Read on!  

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2016 AV Challenge: Tip #2

You may have heard that your words have the power to grow your child’s brain and that children who are successful in kindergarten have heard far more words in their first years than their less successful peers. All of this is true, but it’s not just the number of words that matters… the richness and quality of those words is important, too!

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2016 AV Challenge: Nov-Dec

Join me for the 2016 AV Challenge!  Each week for the next four weeks, I’ll be posting a research-based tip that parents and caregivers can use to help their children with hearing loss develop listening and spoken language skills.

 
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Co-Managing Behavior with Parents

Behavior is a tricky, touchy subject.  Every family parents differently and has different experiences, expectations, and emotions regarding how best to help children learn to behave within the norms of their family and culture.  Usually, parents are the primary disciplinarians, the ones setting the standards for their children and dealing with the tantrums, disagreements, and power struggles that are a normal part of growing up.  But when a child’s behavior needs spill over into a therapy session, how can professionals and parents partner for success?

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ADVANCING PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES IN POVERTY

Susan Lenihan Ph.D., CED

Jenna Voss Ph.D., LSLS Cert. AVEd

Colleen Kinsella

Approximately 1 in 5 children in the US live in poverty.  How can listening and spoken language professionals better serve them?   Continue reading

Complex and Challenging Cases: WEBINAR RECORDING

See below for a recording of my May 2016 presentation for Cochlear and the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children/Renwick Centre “Complex and Challenging Cases” [CC]

 

Falling into a Hole

When I help children learn language, I want them to fall into a really deep hole.  It’s not as mean as it sounds!  By thinking about learning new skills as “falling into a hole” vs. “climbing into a mountain,” we, parents and professionals, can structure our play with children to help them learn more while struggling less.  Here’s how it works.

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