UPCOMING EVENTS: Free Webinars for Parents and Professionals

I am excited to be partnering with some great organizations this spring to give two FREE webinars for parents and professionals.  Both events also offer 1CE credit from the AG Bell Academy for Listening and Spoken Language.  See below for more information and links to register for the courses.

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1 + 1 = 3

I often hear from frustrated parents, “My child knows A, my child knows B, so why on earth can’t she make a sentence with A and B together?  I’m pulling my hair out!”  Moving from single words to phrases of two words or more is a significant milestone in language development.  How do we help children achieve this goal?

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Big Goals for Big Kids

A lot of attention in the AVT world is focused on infants and toddlers — detecting hearing loss at birth, fitting them hearing technology ASAP, and getting their families off to a running start with listening and spoken language early intervention.  When all goes well, many of these children can be fully mainstreamed from preschool and have no need for further therapy.  That’s the ideal.  It happens for many children, but not all.  What about children who are identified as toddlers, or implanted late, or have other complicating factors that lead to slower than expected speech and language progress?  What happens when little kids become big kids who still need intervention?

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Repetition Without Boredom

We know that you need thousands of hours of practice to become an expert at any skill, and many, many repetitions for something to stick. The same is true for children learning new speech, language, or listening skills. But how can we get in the practice they need without boring them (and ourselves!) to tears?

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Do You Know How to D-I-P?

When an infant or toddler first receives hearing technology, it’s an exciting day!  Shortly after, though, parents want to know, “When will he start to talk?”  Stop and listen for a minute.  Do you hear that baby babbling?  What if we could learn to listen and talk to new listeners in a way that would help them build foundational skills for the “real words” that come later?  All you have to know is D-I-P.

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Coaching the Parent Who Doesn’t Attend Therapy

Due to family schedules, it’s usually the same parent or caregiver who is able to attend therapy with the child each week. Each session, this “present parent” receives coaching, modeling, and guidance in becoming their child’s first and best teacher. In a two-parent family, how do we as therapists also provide this same level of support and learning to the “other parent,” the one who isn’t present in the therapy session each week?

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Just Right Challenge

Psychologist Lev Vygotsky is credited with identifying the concept of the “Zone of Proximal Development.”  This “ZPD” is the area between what a learner can do without help and what a learner can do with help — that is, it’s the zone where growth and learning really happen.  Zone of Proximal Development sounds impressive, but for me, I like to think of it as the “Just Right Challenge.”

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Five Strategies to Encourage Your Child to Talk

 

Here are five simple strategies you can use to encourage your child to expand their expressive language at home.  At first, it may seem overwhelming to keep them all in your “toolbox.”  That’s okay!  I suggest focusing on implementing just one new strategy at day for a week.  As you practice and gain confidence, you’ll be able to juggle them all and really get your little one talking up a storm!

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Making Things Sticky

Many parents have had the experience of walking out of a great therapy session and then thinking one day later, “How were we supposed to work on that goal again?”  Likewise, many therapists have had the experience of déjà vu when they feel like their session is just a repeat of last week’s, with no progress toward speech, language, and listening targets.  When we introduce new skills in therapy, how can we ensure that children learn them and parents remember the techniques used to teach them in a way that is fun and meaningful for all?

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Asking All the Right Questions

It’s said that there’s no such thing as a stupid question.  But for therapists who want to communicate well with the families they serve, there are certainly some ways to ask the questions that are smarter than others.  How can therapists ask the questions they need to get crucial information from families, and how can families ask their pressing questions in ways that help them become fully informed, empowered members of the therapy team?  There’s no such thing as a dumb question, but if we think more carefully about how we are asking, not just what we are asking, the lines of communication may become clearer.

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