2016 AV Challenge: Tip #2

You may have heard that your words have the power to grow your child’s brain and that children who are successful in kindergarten have heard far more words in their first years than their less successful peers. All of this is true, but it’s not just the number of words that matters… the richness and quality of those words is important, too!

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2016 AV Challenge: Tip #1

Did you know that babies practice talking long before they say their first words.  This week’s tip, BABBLE MATTERS, is about the importance of baby’s coos and goos.  As it turns out, goo goo ga ga isn’t just adorable, it’s the foundation for later language success.

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2016 AV Challenge: Nov-Dec

Join me for the 2016 AV Challenge!  Each week for the next four weeks, I’ll be posting a research-based tip that parents and caregivers can use to help their children with hearing loss develop listening and spoken language skills.

 
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Music, Art, Theatre, and Dance Lessons for Children with Hearing Loss

There are many benefits of music, theater, art, and dance education for all.  Arts education is linked to improved focus and behavior, academic achievement, higher SAT scores, and a host of other benefits.  The positive cognitive, creative, physical, social effects are undeniable.  But what about arts education for children with hearing loss? 

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GENERAL SESSION – KEYNOTE SPEAKER

David Sousa, Ed.D.

David Sousa shared insights from the field of educational neuroscience, which combines psychology, neuroscience, and pedagogy to study the interaction between mind, brain, and education.  With technology influencing nearly every aspect of our lives, how has this changed the way children relate and learn? Continue reading

QUALITY OR QUANTITY OF LANGUAGE: WHERE TO FOCUS?

Ronda Rufsvold ABD, LSLS Cert. AVEd

Ye Wang Ph.D.

Ronda Rufsvold, a PhD student in the Deaf Education program at Teachers College, Columbia University, under the direction of Dr. Wang, presented her research on quantity vs. quality of child directed language.   Continue reading

Complex and Challenging Cases: WEBINAR RECORDING

See below for a recording of my May 2016 presentation for Cochlear and the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children/Renwick Centre “Complex and Challenging Cases” [CC]

 

Aim for the Middle

It is so exciting to read about people with hearing loss in the news accomplishing great things.  Academic award winners, artists, actors, athletes — their stories raise public awareness about hearing loss and dispel stereotypes about people who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Conversely, there are those people with hearing loss who struggle mightily — never achieving age-appropriate language abilities, falling behind in school, or failing to find employment.  With such a broad spectrum of outcomes for people with hearing loss, how do we make sense of it all?

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Falling into a Hole

When I help children learn language, I want them to fall into a really deep hole.  It’s not as mean as it sounds!  By thinking about learning new skills as “falling into a hole” vs. “climbing into a mountain,” we, parents and professionals, can structure our play with children to help them learn more while struggling less.  Here’s how it works.

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Back to the Audiogram

A child with hearing loss may visit the audiologist once every few months, or, for an older child, only for a yearly check up.  In contrast, these same children often see their therapists much, much more frequently (an average Auditory Verbal Therapy family receives one hour of therapy each week).  How can therapists (and teachers) partner with audiologists to make the child’s audiological information relevant each and every day, not just during periodic audiology appointments?  We know hearing is the key to developing spoken language, so how do we make this information understandable and valuable to families each day?

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